Through film, education about clandestine migration
Mar 14, 2019

As part of our International Women’s Day activities on March 8, we partnered with a Dakar association, Action Citoyenne pour la Solidarité et le Développement (Citizens for Solidarity and Development) to screen the film “Alpha/Aisadou,” which documents the effects of clandestine migration on a Senegalese mother and her son. The film was created by Alberto Amoretti and Giovanni Hänninen, two Italian filmmakers who were residents at Thread.

The association’s theme for the day was the “Role and Responsibility of Women in Preventing Clandestine Migration,” and over 80 people attended the screening to watch the film and discuss the complex issues it portrays. Some mothers, for example, support the migration of their sons. They are often unaware of the journey’s perils and believe it will yield a better life for their entire family. Others are staunchly against it and implore their sons not to leave. Still, many young men migrate because they see no career opportunities for themselves in Senegal and cannot bear to see their mothers, or their sisters or wives, living in poverty.

Because there are no easy solutions to the problem, the goal of the screenings is to provide firsthand accounts of those who have migrated, such as Alpha, who lacks papers and subsists on the fringes of Italian society, so that the realities of the experience are clear.

Massamba Camara, who has been organizing the screenings throughout Senegal, said, “It was the first time I saw people break into tears during the screening. Over five women cried, some because they had lost their brothers, others because they never knew their sons had made such a dangerous journey trying to make them happy.”