A New Way to Support Girls’ Education
Nov 19, 2018

In Tambacounda, young women face many obstacles to pursuing education, from early marriage and child-bearing to their families not wanting them to attend school. Most of them are also impeded by an issue that is not prominent in developed countries: a lack of sanitary pads during menstruation. Because young women in Tambacounda can’t afford or access hygienic products, they don’t attend school when they are menstruating. These gaps in attendance are detrimental to each girl’s education, often holding them back from graduating and attending college. Some girls do fashion their own pads from whatever materials they have available, whether it’s old clothes, mattress foam, or leaves—none of which is hygienic.

Le Korsa is working to improve the situation. Thanks to a partnership with Mary Consolata Namagambe, the founder of the Ugandan-based organization She for She, which teaches young women to create their own comfortable and reusable sanitary pads, we ran an important production and business training at the Foyer de Jeunes Filles.

From October 25 to 31, Mary and four professional seamstresses worked with six girls at the Foyer. They taught this small group to make reusable sanitary pads, but also how they might turn the operation into a small business by producing and selling large orders of pads to local organizations and schools. Le Korsa is actively helping the Foyer develop a business plan for this project, which will be designed to provide a source of employment for those girls who are unable to pass the entrance exam to college. We are just in the early stages of what we will hope will be a transformative enterprise for the young women of the Foyer, and of Tambacounda.

Thanks to Mary, and to the generosity of Laurel and Mike Hixon, we were also able to bring 200 pads to the rural village of Fass, and run a workshop on feminine hygiene with the nurses at the medical center. Finally, in Sinthian, Mary and Le Korsa team members taught a large group of young women and girls to hand-sew their own pads, using fabrics that they might have available.

Soon, we hope, all of these women will have one less obstacle between them and their education.