News

Wassadou’s garden, revitalized
Jan 31, 2018

Brian Harris sent this amazing report back from Wassadou Medical Center, where we have worked to replant and restore the garden that once provided food to the staff and patients.

“The nearly two hectares of land behind the Wassadou Medical Center, with a well run dry and a very recent, all-consuming bush fire, could have easily fallen back into dense, useless, scrub land. With a grant from World Connect, we were able to empower Njaree Ngom to deepen the well, and to hire two gardeners and a technician. The garden here has enormous potential, and having only started on January 1st, I am thrilled with what has already been accomplished.

The produce, used in both the hospital for staff meals and for sale on the market, can supply nutritious food to the center and the neighboring communities. On my visit, I met a cheerful Dr. Ndaiy, walking with a young Premier Urgence staffer named Clementine, who was infectiously optimistic about expanding the garden in the entire two hectares.”

We’ll send back another report from our February trip to Senegal.

A market garden is coming to Wassadou
Nov 02, 2017

Wassadou medical center, located between Tambacounda and Kedougou, is a crucial health outpost for the rural villages of the area. The center’s doctors and staff all live on site, and once upon a time they had a beautiful market garden that provided food for meals as well as income for the center. But in recent years, due to a lack of resources, they could no longer care for the garden and its many fruit trees. The center lost an immediate source of food and income, and the staff’s morale dropped as a result. So we’re thrilled to report that we’re bringing the garden back.

World Connect, who funded the Fass garden, has agreed to help us fund the restoration of the garden at Wassadou. To get it flourishing again, the Wassadou staff will be drilling a new bore well and devoting two full-time staff to watering, maintenance, and oversight of the crops. Habib Dieye, Le Korsa’s agricultural coordinator, will be offering his expertise to ensure Wassadou’s staff is properly trained in market gardening.

It’s an exciting development that means Wassadou Medical Center will again be operating at its full potential. With improved staff performance, and more income, the center is capable of treating 10,000 patients per year. We’ll keep you posted as the work begins.

Thread earns accolades in African Architecture Awards
Oct 17, 2017

We are delighted to announce that Thread has been awarded a Certificate of Merit in the 2017 African Architecture Awards. It stood out from over 300 submissions to the contest.

The awards inspired fierce debate about the identity of African architecture, and the jury’s decisions were made only after much dialogue and deliberation. You can read more about it in the Architectural Review.

We are thrilled to have been part of such an impassioned debate, and to have Thread be recognized among so many other excellent buildings and projects. Congratulations to Toshiko Mori and her team of architects, including Jordan MacTavish, who designed Thread!

Support beekeeping in Senegal
Sep 26, 2017

We have an amazing opportunity to help our friends in rural Sinthian, Senegal, earn money through beekeeping, and preserve their environment in the process. Please join us in supporting them and promoting a healthy ecosystem! You can make a donation on our Go Fund Me campaign page, https://www.gofundme.com/keeping-bees-creating-jobs, and learn more about the beekeepers and the incredible honey they are harvesting. Thank you so much for your support!

A third container of supplies for Tambacounda Hospital
Sep 05, 2017

We are thrilled to report that a third container of medical supplies, donated by Project C.U.R.E. and shipped by Le Korsa, arrived to Tambacounda Hospital last week.

This shipment, which included new beds, surgery tables, dental equipment, as well as plenty of basics such as gauze, gloves, and sanitizer, will allow the hospital’s staff to offer better care, and provide greater comfort to the many patients who visit the hospital.

But Tambacounda Hospital’s needs go far beyond supplies. It has difficulties in attracting enough qualified staff, because its salaries are not as high as hospitals in other regions, and its wards are often overcrowded. To help alleviate this problem, we are embarking upon an expansion and redesign of the maternity and pediatric wards with architect Manuel Herz, in close collaboration with Dr. Sylla and other staff. Undoubtedly, we will be sending more supplies to outfit those new wards when the time comes.

In the meantime, we remain grateful to Project C.U.R.E., and to our partners at Tambacounda Hospital, for all their hard work to make this shipment possible.

Summer Camp for Underprivileged Youth
Jul 26, 2017

In partnership with the Tambacounda Cultural Center, Le Korsa and Thread helped initiate a summer arts camp for handicapped and orphaned children in the region of Tambacounda, which ran from July 7-27.

The camp, which was staffed by local artists and performers, offered the students classes in painting, sculpture, ballet, and the transformation of gourds into musical instruments or bowls. The children also visited and stayed overnight at Thread, giving them a chance to learn about the art and community programs there, as well as to visit the banana growing region and learn more about the local agricultural economy.

Sinthian’s first honey harvest
Jul 17, 2017

Brian Harris, Le Korsa’s Director of Programming and Special Projects, just sent this report on the first honey to be harvested by the men’s apiculture group in Sinthian.

“Last week at Thread we received Kebby, our beekeeping guru from the Gambia. One year ago we were trained at their facility in Kombo – southeast of Banjul. Our novice beekeeping team at Thread had many questions on how to proceed and were delighted to have Kebby follow-up with us on site.

Great news: we harvested from 2 rushes and comfortably extracted the honey from the combs in our new transformation hut (situated in-between Thread and the rushes). Kebby tested the purity of the honey (with a special instrument that measures water content) and we found that the honey is the highest grade in West Africa (15% water content). It’s a clear, light-yellow color. You can taste floral accents within the rich sweetness of the honey. Kebby told us that this honey can be stored indefinitely and will fetch the highest price on the local and international markets. Similarly, the wax is an ideal color and consistency and can be used to make soap, candles or skin products.

We learned a lot from the visit – how to reorganize the rushes, equipment and the group’s work schedule. Maintenance of hives was stressed (preventing further black beetle attack). Kebby left us with a long to-do list and instructions on how to optimize our honey production and support the bee population in our area.

Looking forward, there is an exciting opportunity to involve the women’s group in the processing of bee’s wax into soap and other products. Furthermore, as the hives develop, we will see increased production of honey and can naturally increase the number of rushes.”

Alan Riding interviews Dr. Magueye Ba
Jul 13, 2017

At the suggestion of one of his professors at medical school in Dakar, Dr. Ba moved 300 miles south-east to Sinthian in 2005 to take charge of the village’s health clinic. Since then, he has emerged as an important community leader, not only helping to establish a medical center and primary school in another village, Fass, but also serving as a crucial interlocutor for Le Korsa.

– Alan Riding

Q – What were the main difficulties you found when you first arrived in Sinthian?
A – Most villagers did not know about medical treatment. If a child had a seizure, he’d be taken to the marabout (imam) or to a charlatan. At that time, we received only 180 to 200 patients per month; now we receive over 1,000 every month. For example, woman now routinely come to the hospital to give birth.
Q – What are the most frequent ailments?
A – Malaria is the main reason people come to the center. This is a problem all year round, but worst during the rainy season. The most vulnerable are children under five. If parents are slow to bring them for treatment, they can die.
Q – What about malnutrition?
A – Yes, it’s also a problem, but La Korsa’s new women’s gardening program (in Sinthian and three other villages) is helping. Traditionally, people only produced cereals. Now, with vegetables and fruit, I’m seeing improvements in the nutrition of the under-five’s.
Q – Do you offer family planning?
A – Yes. Ten years ago, women didn’t know about that and there were a lot of unwanted pregnancies. Now it is often the husband who brings his wife to seek help in family planning.
Q – Do patients pay?
A – Many belong to a health insurance agency. If they cannot afford medical attention, Le Korsa helps them. Le Korsa has also donated ambulances to Sinthian and Fass.
Q – Talking of Fass, the village south of the Gambia River, was there resistance to girls and boys studying together in the village’s first primary school, which Le Korsa is now building? (It should open in early 2018.)
A – No. The religious leaders were more worried that the school could threaten their religion (Islam). But we assured the marabout that Le Korsa is not a religious organization. Normally a community school takes in children of between five and seven, but this will include older children, from ten to twelve, because they have never been to school. Some 200 children have been inscribed to enter the school.

Progress in Fass
Jun 20, 2017

Jordan MacTavish, an architect with Toshiko Mori’s office, is overseeing the design and construction of the first-ever school in Fass, which is being funded by Le Korsa supporters Laurel Hixon and Michael Keane. Jordan was recently on-site to supervise the project, and we are pleased to report that the school will be ready for students in the fall of 2018, transforming forever the life of this rural village. Thanks to Brian Harris for the great photos.

Good news from Wassadou
May 17, 2017

When French NGO Première Urgence took over the administration of the languishing Wassadou Medical Center in 2014, the center’s staff worked tirelessly to restore the clinic to its full capacity of providing medical services to upwards of 10,000 patients per year.

Having seen their results—and that the center could still be improved and provide more care—we partnered with Première Urgence in 2016, offering a grant that allowed the center to restore staff salaries to their pre-2014 levels, and to make general repairs to the building. We also worked with our partner Project C.U.R.E. to ship a container of needed medical supplies to the center.

Wassadou’s 2016 report has just come in, and we’re thrilled that last year, their staff was able to see almost 500 more patients than in 2015, bringing the total number of patients seen in 2016 to 13,184. The doctors, midwives and nurses also expanded their mobile medical teams, and have been offering more education on family planning, AIDS, and malaria prevention. We salute all of the staff there, and look forward to working with them, and with Première Urgence, to offer even more care in the years to come.