News

Thread featured in TIME’s World’s Greatest Places
Aug 23, 2018

Thread, the artists’ residency and cultural center in Sinthian created by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and Le Korsa, and designed by Toshiko Mori Architect, has been selected as one of Time magazine’s “The World’s Greatest Places.”

This is Time’s first annual list of 100 destinations that are breaking new ground, leading industry trends, and offering visitors an extraordinary experience. Read more here.

Broadcasting from the Foyer de Jeunes Filles
Jul 30, 2018

From June 26 to July 1, twenty young women at the Foyer de Jeunes Filles in Tambacounda learned the basics of radio and print journalism from two well-known Senegalese journalists, El Bachir Sow and Mbagnick Diouf. The program, coordinated in part by Le Korsa and the Foyer, was designed to help the young women develop storytelling and reporting skills while also learning more about women’s rights and the ill consequences of early marriage.

The journalists taught the young women how to conduct interviews, how to write for print and for radio, and how journalism could be a tool for change in their communities. The participants then produced a radio program on early marriage, which you can listen to here (please note it is in French). They also produced a French-language newspaper, which you can download here.

We are thrilled with all the women at the Foyer accomplished in a few short days, and are looking forward to seeing these voices develop. A huge thanks goes out to El Bachir Sow, Mbagnick Diouf, Victoria Ebin, and Maimouna Ka Sow, for all their work in putting together this excellent workshop.

A look at the Tambacounda Hospital expansion
Jun 21, 2018

We’re very excited to share some renderings for the Tambacounda Hospital expansion being created by architect Manuel Herz.

The new S-shaped building will maintain a visual consistency with the existing hospital structures, and contain two floors of much-needed space.

The first floor will house an updated and expanded maternity ward, and the second floor will be the home of a large pediatrics unit. These new facilities will be life-changing and life-saving for the patients and staff of Tambacounda Hospital, who have long endured crowded waiting areas and cramped examination and operating rooms.

Both Wallpaper magazine and De Zeen have articles with further information.

 

Arch Daily on the Tambacounda Hospital Project
Jun 06, 2018

The architecture website Arch Daily has a nice article about the Tambacounda Hospital expansion project, which Manuel Herz is designing. Members of Manuel’s team were in Senegal this month to meet with hospital staff and city engineers in preparation for the construction process.

Sharing the realities of clandestine migration
Mar 21, 2018

Over the last ten years an enormous number of African men and women have attempted migration to Europe in search of a better life. Too often, as the news constantly reminds us, that better life is not to be found: the journey from West Africa to Libya is often fatal; those who do make it to the coast may not make it across the Mediterranean; and the well-paying job in Europe never materializes for those without a legal right to be there.

This reality, as Le Korsa has learned, is misunderstood by so many in Senegal, and most often by the very young men and women who would risk their lives as migrants. Le Korsa is acting to change that. We have launched a series of film screenings and discussions throughout the Tambacounda region that educate potential migrants and their families about the hazards of the journey. Arranged and coordinated by our staff, the screenings unite mothers, daughters, sons, teachers, artists, local leaders and so many more to see true accounts of migrants, and to discuss how the resources devoted to migration—often substantial sums of money—could be better used in Tambacounda.

After the first screening in Sinthian of “Alpha/Aisadou,” a short film about a mother in Sinthian and her son who has left the village for a precarious life in Sicily, one young man stood up and said, “I planned to sell my goats and leave for Europe, but now I plan to keep them and make a life here.” On March 8, International Women’s Day, we arranged another screening in Tambacounda, thanks to the support of “Niani Wouli,” a women’s group whose members have lost the men in their lives to migration. Afterwards, many women in the audience stated that they would no longer support migration, and would encourage others to speak out.

We have much work to do. Eighteen more screenings are planned for the coming months, thanks to the tireless organization of Massamba Camara. And none would be possible without the six incredible films, created by Alberto Amoretti and Giovanni Hänninen, each of which focuses on a different theme of migration from Senegal to Sicily.

We also thank you, our donors, because your generosity makes such programs possible. If you would like to contribute to this effort, please visit our secure donation page. Thank you.

– Andrew Seguin, Director of Communications

To view the trailer of “Alpha/Aisadou,” please click here: https://vimeo.com/258309032/0ed32a12f3

Fass’s school, ready to change lives
Feb 21, 2018

The celebration of the school in Fass on Tuesday, February 13, was beyond thrilling. It marked years of preparation and negotiations by Le Korsa and Dr. Magueye Ba with the local leaders, who finally agreed two years ago to allow Le Korsa to build a non-Koranic school, the first ever in the village. It is a sea change for Fass, where illiteracy is nearly total. The outward look that secular education will bring to the children of Fass is palpable in the school’s design, which is airy and circular, dappled by light, and from every point open to the world.

Laurel Hixon and Michael Keane, who made the school’s construction possible through donations and fundraising, were on hand to see the structure for the first time. Jordan MacTavish, who designed the school, was there, too, to see it filled with students and truly come alive. But no one could have been more excited than the future students themselves, who already feel at home in the school’s inviting spaces. There is still some construction to complete, including thatching the roof, so the students won’t attend classes there until next fall, but the feeling of progess in Fass is incredible. Thanks to all who made it possible.

Wassadou’s garden, revitalized
Jan 31, 2018

Brian Harris sent this amazing report back from Wassadou Medical Center, where we have worked to replant and restore the garden that once provided food to the staff and patients.

“The nearly two hectares of land behind the Wassadou Medical Center, with a well run dry and a very recent, all-consuming bush fire, could have easily fallen back into dense, useless, scrub land. With a grant from World Connect, we were able to empower Njaree Ngom to deepen the well, and to hire two gardeners and a technician. The garden here has enormous potential, and having only started on January 1st, I am thrilled with what has already been accomplished.

The produce, used in both the hospital for staff meals and for sale on the market, can supply nutritious food to the center and the neighboring communities. On my visit, I met a cheerful Dr. Ndaiy, walking with a young Premier Urgence staffer named Clementine, who was infectiously optimistic about expanding the garden in the entire two hectares.”

We’ll send back another report from our February trip to Senegal.

A market garden is coming to Wassadou
Nov 02, 2017

Wassadou medical center, located between Tambacounda and Kedougou, is a crucial health outpost for the rural villages of the area. The center’s doctors and staff all live on site, and once upon a time they had a beautiful market garden that provided food for meals as well as income for the center. But in recent years, due to a lack of resources, they could no longer care for the garden and its many fruit trees. The center lost an immediate source of food and income, and the staff’s morale dropped as a result. So we’re thrilled to report that we’re bringing the garden back.

World Connect, who funded the Fass garden, has agreed to help us fund the restoration of the garden at Wassadou. To get it flourishing again, the Wassadou staff will be drilling a new bore well and devoting two full-time staff to watering, maintenance, and oversight of the crops. Habib Dieye, Le Korsa’s agricultural coordinator, will be offering his expertise to ensure Wassadou’s staff is properly trained in market gardening.

It’s an exciting development that means Wassadou Medical Center will again be operating at its full potential. With improved staff performance, and more income, the center is capable of treating 10,000 patients per year. We’ll keep you posted as the work begins.

Thread earns accolades in African Architecture Awards
Oct 17, 2017

We are delighted to announce that Thread has been awarded a Certificate of Merit in the 2017 African Architecture Awards. It stood out from over 300 submissions to the contest.

The awards inspired fierce debate about the identity of African architecture, and the jury’s decisions were made only after much dialogue and deliberation. You can read more about it in the Architectural Review.

We are thrilled to have been part of such an impassioned debate, and to have Thread be recognized among so many other excellent buildings and projects. Congratulations to Toshiko Mori and her team of architects, including Jordan MacTavish, who designed Thread!

Support beekeeping in Senegal
Sep 26, 2017

We have an amazing opportunity to help our friends in rural Sinthian, Senegal, earn money through beekeeping, and preserve their environment in the process. Please join us in supporting them and promoting a healthy ecosystem! You can make a donation on our Go Fund Me campaign page, https://www.gofundme.com/keeping-bees-creating-jobs, and learn more about the beekeepers and the incredible honey they are harvesting. Thank you so much for your support!